Posts Tagged ‘medical’

Carcinogenic role of protein in liver decoded

The EGF Receptor (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor, EGFR) is a protein which, as a transmembrane receptor, controls a multitude of vital processes in the cell. In human beings, the EGF Receptor is present in many cells types and plays an important role in many types of cancer. It is present in various kinds of tumors in excessive amounts and/or in mutated form, which causes the tumor cells to grow and multiply. For this reason the EGFR serves as a point of attack in many treatment strategies. In the process, its function is inhibited with the objective of slowing down the growth of the tumor cell.

The liver cell carcinoma (hepatocellular carcinoma, short HCC) is one of the most frequent malignant tumors worldwide. Approximately six percent of all cancers in men and about three percent in women are liver cell carcinomas. It is the second most frequent cause of death associated with cancer. Risk factors for HCC include liver diseases through Hepatitis B and C infections as well as alcohol abuse or the classic “fatty liver.”

Up to now, the tumor-promoting role of EGFR has only been linked with its expression directly in the tumor cells. However, the study group of Maria Sibilia, Manager of the Institute for Cancer Research at the Medical University of Vienna and Deputy Manager of the Comprehensive Cancer Centre, in cooperation with the research groups of Michael Trauner and Markus Peck-Radosavljevic at the clinical division for gastroenterology and hepatology (Manager: Michael Trauner) as well as the Eastern Hepatobiliary Surgery Institute/Hospital in Shanghai discovered that EGFR plays a more decisive role in the macrophages of the liver (these are important cells of the immune system which are called Kupffer cells in the liver) with respect to the growth of the liver cell carcinoma than previously assumed.

“In this study we were able to prove that the inhibition of EGFR has a tumor inhibiting effect on the macrophages and not its inhibition on the tumor cell itself,” explains Maria Sibilia. However, if the EGFR conversely exists on these macrophages in an excessive number, it can promote the growth of the tumor. Its existence on the macrophages reduces the chance of survival for HCC patients.

This could explain why EGFR inhibitors utilised for cancer treatment and aiming directly for the tumor cells have achieved clinically disappointing results in the fight against the liver cell carcinoma in the past. For the first time, this study proves the tumor-promoting mechanism for EGFR in non-tumor cells, which could lead to more effective and precise treatment strategies with macrophages as a point of approach in the future.

source : http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140901090303.htm

Invisible blood in urine may indicate bladder cancer

Scientists at the University of Exeter Medical School found that one in 60 people over the age of 60 who had invisible blood in their urine (identified by their GP testing their urine) transpired to have bladder cancer. The figure was around half those who had visible blood in their urine — the best known indicator of bladder cancer. However, it was still higher than figures for other potential symptoms of bladder cancer that warrant further investigation.

Lead author Sarah Price, a PhD student at the University of Exeter Medical School, led the first robust study to investigate whether invisible blood in urine can indicate bladder cancer. Speaking as the study is published in the British Journal of General Practice on September 1 2014, she said: “It is well known that if you see blood in your urine you should contact your GP, who is likely to refer you for tests. But there is no clear guidance for GPs on what to do if they detect blood that is not visible during routine tests. We are hopeful that our findings will now lead to robust guidance that it warrants further investigation. Early diagnosis is crucial to have the best chance of successfully treating bladder cancer. The three-quarters of patients who are diagnosed early have much better outcomes than those whose disease is diagnosed late. Anything we can do to boost early detection is crucial to help save lives.”

The study examined more than 26,000 people whose anonymized data contributed to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink; this is a large research database used by the Exeter team in several cancer studies. The team found that the risk of bladder cancer was 1.6 per cent in people over 60 who had invisible blood in their urine.

Around 10,000 people in the UK are diagnosed with bladder cancer each year. The condition is more common in men than women and in older people, with the average age of diagnosis at 68. Smoking is among the main causes.

source : http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/09/140901090731.htm

Fighting prostate cancer with tomato-rich diet

With 35,000 new cases every year in the UK, and around 10,000 deaths, prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men worldwide.

Rates are higher in developed countries, which some experts believe is linked to a Westernised diet and lifestyle.

To assess if following dietary and lifestyle recommendations reduces risk of prostate cancer, researchers at the Universities of Bristol, Cambridge and Oxford looked at the diets and lifestyle of 1,806 men aged between 50 and 69 with prostate cancer and compared with 12,005 cancer-free men.

The NIHR-funded study, published in the medical journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, is the first study of its kind to develop a prostate cancer ‘dietary index’ which consists of dietary components — selenium, calcium and foods rich in lycopene — that have been linked to prostate cancer.

Men who had optimal intake of these three dietary components had a lower risk of prostate cancer.

Tomatoes and its products — such as tomato juice and baked beans — were shown to be most beneficial, with an 18 per cent reduction in risk found in men eating over 10 portions a week.

This is thought to be due to lycopene, an antioxidant which fights off toxins that can cause DNA and cell damage. Vanessa Er, from the School of Social and Community Medicine at the University of Bristol and Bristol Nutrition BRU, led the research.

She said: “Our findings suggest that tomatoes may be important in prostate cancer prevention. However, further studies need to be conducted to confirm our findings, especially through human trials. Men should still eat a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, maintain a healthy weight and stay active.”

The researchers also looked at the recommendations on physical activity, diet and body weight for cancer prevention published by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR).

Only the recommendation on plant foods — high intake of fruits, vegetables and dietary fibre — was found to be associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. As these recommendations are not targeted at prostate cancer prevention, researchers concluded that adhering to these recommendations is not sufficient and that additional dietary recommendations should be developed.

source : http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140827100218.htm